Fun in the Sun For the Whole Family – The Top Family Vacation Spots in North Beach

It is no surprise that so many families return to North Myrtle Beach condo rentals year after year. It is almost impossible to beat this fun destination for family friendly atmosphere and good old fashioned beachy fun. Located north of famous Myrtle Beach, this neighborhood is known for its charming atmosphere and quiet comfort. It is part of the Grand Strand, meaning that any beach vacation rentals in this area will have easy access to any of the amenities located in or around Myrtle Beach proper.

The north area, although connected to the exclusive condo downtown area, has charm enough on its own. Many families come to this area and never need to venture south at all! A bit of preparation will show parents how to plan an eventful trip that will let their whole family enjoys north beach vacation rentals to the utmost.

Step One: Picking From the North Beach Vacation Rentals

There are many options for housing in the area, but north beach vacation rentals are by far the most common. In this part of the Grand Strand, hotels are less common as the area becomes more residential in feel. Of the housing rentals, Myrtle Beach condo rentals are the most common. These offer a lot of variety, both in terms of size and location. It is possible to find waterfront units, but there are also economical units placed off the beach but with easy access. There are also units of varying sizes, from one bedroom hideaways to larger units that give even extensive families room to spread out and get comfortable.

It is generally best for families new to the luxury condo kuala lumpur Grand Strand to rent from a company rather than a private owner. Although many privately owned north beach vacation rentals are well maintained … Read the rest

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The Greatest Truck on Earth

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The best mode of transportation is probably the pickup truck. It was one of the first designs developed by the early pioneers of automobile manufacturing. The design is simple and very efficient. The pick up truck is basically a wagon with the horse removed. In place of the horse an internal combustion engine was used. This had a lot of benefits over a living animal. Namely, you did not have to deal with the temperament of an animal.

This is not to say that engines are not temperamental because they can be, especially on really cold mornings. However the engine did not have to be removed at the end of the day and taken to the stable to be fed and cared for. This made the truck a lot more efficient than a horse.

The pickup truck has not been radically redesigned since the inception of the idea. This goes to show just how efficient the horse and wagon truly was. When steel was added to the frame and tempered steel load bearing springs and shocks were incorporated, the wagon got serious. It was turned into a pickup truck.

The engine was an efficient means of power and was easily maintained and worked on when needed. This made the pickup truck a great way of transporting goods and materials. The pickup truck soon became indispensable down on the farm, city, and anywhere else wagons were used.

The Ford Motor Company was one of the first automobile manufacturers to mass produce a pickup truck. The Ford pickup truck was designated as the F150. The pickup truck soon got fancy. The engine produced heat and that was used to heat the interior cab of the truck. This made for a comfortable ride in the winter. Incorporating a 4 wheel drive system and … Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Read More →

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Read More →

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Read More →